How to Get Started in Selling Fine Art and Landscape Photography

Photography is a buyer’s market. Digital photography has flooded the photography market with an endless sea of photographers who want to sell their work. This article seeks to teach you how to begin selling your photography.

We see photographs every day, and many of them in connection with advertising. Photos of beautiful landscapes which people cannot identify are not interesting to buyers at an art fair. For example, I live in Naples, Florida. I’ve been to dozens of art fairs and one thing rings true every time: Rarely do buyers purchase a beautiful photograph of a beach scene unless they know where the scene is. They want to buy local photographs of local places. They want to feel connected with the photograph. A “generic” landscape photo which the buyer doesn’t identify with might as well be a $2 poster at WalMart. The first lesson to learn is to take photos of local scenery. What are people in your town proud of? The beautiful mountains surrounding the city? The pier going out into the bay? The downtown lights at Christmas time? Every town has something beautiful. Remember, though, that you’ll have to photograph that scene in a way that they wouldn’t view as plain or ordinary. Dress the scene up in beautiful light and make it dramatic.

If you plan on showing your work off, you have to be ruthless. Be ruthless with yourself. Take all of your very best images and put them in one folder on your computer. Look through each image and ask yourself, “Would this image ‘wow’ someone who saw it for the first time and who was not there to see the scene first hand?” If the answer is no, then take it out of your art show. If the answer is yes, then choose 10 of your friends who have the least tact and ask them if they are “wowed.” Photography is subjective, so you’ll get conflicting answers, but remember…if it doesn’t wow them, there are 10,000 other images to choose from. Including “less-than-wow” images in your gallery will drag down the perceived value of your art.

You might be proud of the technical perfection of your images, and your photo club might be proud, but the average small-time art buyer just doesn’t care. The truth is that buyers purchase whatever strikes them as beautiful, and simply do not care if an image has technical imperfections. The buyer just doesn’t care if you use a 1D Mark IV or a Canon Rebel XT. The proof is in the pudding.

So where are you going to sell your local fine art photography? A few things you might try are art fairs (if you can’t find them, you aren’t looking, because they are EVERYWHERE), placing your work in coffee shops for free to decorate their shop and then have a sticker on each image for people to buy, or submitting articles to your local paper with a link to your website.

Good luck in selling your fine art photography. The truth is that the market is so saturated that it is extraordinarily difficult to sell. To beat the bunch, you have to go local. Make your town proud of your town.

Where To Get Great Ideas For Landscaping

It is kind of wearing when I open my window every day staring at my same old garden. It looks somehow neglected although I always keep it tidy and pretty. The same plants, same terrain, and same arbors, all look old on my garden. This itchy feeling is suddenly creeping on my palms, bringing an urge to make something new.

Then images of landscape start to pop out in my mind, the images of my neighbors’ garden when I visited their house, the images of real estate advertisements where they put beautiful garden around the advertised houses, the images of my own fancy garden. Confusion slowly occupies my mind. To top that, I do not have any clue on what or where to begin with.

Fortunately, I do not have any hyperventilating issue. So I go to my pantry, prepare myself a hot cup of black coffee which sometimes helps a lot. While zipping my hot coffee, my eyes go to that same old garden outside my window, thinking where to get great ideas for landscaping. The stack of magazines on the book shelf looks appealing. I grab some, browse each page to seek beautiful garden pictures or residence advertisements, and not forgetting to put a sticky note on the page containing the landscape design I prefer for my garden.

After finishing with that, I open the noted pages to review each design once again. They are inspiring yet not really fitting the requirements I seek for my garden. Hence I approach my laptop to search more alluring ideas. Obviously there are hundreds designs of flawless gardens which need thorough evaluation before determining to save some for my own reference. Those designs indeed evoke more ideas for landscaping my sought garden.

The dimension of the most preferred design thereinafter should accommodate the terrain of my garden. Each garden has its own character that requires adjustment in every angle. It occurs to me that I probably need to seek advice from professionals on this, considering my lack of knowledge on landscape design. The consequence of this concern however is the escalating budget, especially their huge fees. Not yet to mention their choice of materials, plants, decorations, and deadline which on some cases I heard are long overdue. Such constraints should be excluded from my tight schedule and, of course, budget as well. Will the grand expectation and limited budget collide at perfect combination?

How to Decorate With Black Bamboo

A member of the grass family, bamboo is one of the world’s greenest materials, capable of replenishing itself in a single growth cycle. Surprisingly durable, bamboo can be used for a variety of functions and products, as well as for a variety of decorative styles. From a chic, contemporary room with blond flooring, to a fun, tropical-themed room with bamboo-framed beach signs, the sturdy grass is an affordable and renewable material that is as versatile, as strong and as attractive as wood.

When it comes to decorating with this versatile material, black bamboo raises the bar on style. The sable color and natural form has a look of exotic elegance. Evoking scenes of luxury, it adds a layer of sophistication to homes, both indoors and out. No matter what the decorative style of a home, including accents or furnishings crafted from the glossy black canes adds an international flair to the design, as if the furnishings were collected carefully over time through extensive travel.

While black bamboo poles have the look of rare and expensive ebony wood, they are far less costly. Affordable, they can be used without restraint to make the most of their striking appearance. As a bundle displayed in a large vase, they make a strong design statement that adds style, depth and texture to a room’s decor. They can be used to create distinctive frames for black and white photographs. These poles can quickly transform a simple mirror into a handsome accent.

Professional decorators and landscapers value the color black as a design element. Black adds weight, mass, depth and gravitas to both interiors and exteriors. When the color is available in a natural material, it becomes even more useful in design. Indoors, the inky color adds a feeling of weight and durability to a coffee table crafted with bamboo poles and a glass top. Outdoors, using black outdoor bamboo fencing will make a yard or garden appear larger than it is, while adding a note of modern style to the scene.

Natural elements, such as canes, grasses, wood and stone, are valuable design elements as well. They can be used to give rooms the exotic feel of a tropical jungle or to create the serene mood of the seaside at sunset. Both indoor and outdoors spaces are always more effective when the goal is to create an environment that best suits those who inhabit them. Using natural, renewable materials like black bamboo is an affordable way to establish atmosphere with style.